Posted By: Francis Koster Published: January 10, 2021

When I was a kid, there is a little ritual that happened in private. I later learned my parents referred to it as “The Talk”. At some age-appropriate point, my dad would invite “just the two of us” out for a fishing trip. After we dropped an anchor and threw our baited hooks into the water, I was trapped. After we caught a fish or two, he would bring up changes he was seeing underway in my body, and how I was probably beginning to face new biological urges. He explained that these changes carried with them moral and ethical responsibilities. The discussion was uncomfortable - but necessary. He was a good parent. As you contemplate your future and think about how your survivors will manage after you leave them, talking with them about your inevitable death is potentially a similarly stressful conversation, but because your parent can no longer trap you in a boat, you can avoid it. Most of us do. We stop behaving like responsible adults and shirk our responsibility as parents.

Posted By: Francis Koster Published: December 20, 2020

Chances of catching Covid-19 are up to 18 times higher if you are exposed to someone who has it while you are indoors compared to being outdoors.[1] This is because the virus particles do not blow away like it would if you were both outside. If you are in a modern building with a new air conditioning system, the danger is less because it was designed bring in oxygen rich fresh air frequently. If you are unlucky enough to work in an old building, the virus concentration grows hourly as the infected folks near you continue to breathe it out. This infection is spread by people who do not know they are infected and for a 10 day period unknowingly infect others until symptoms begin to show up. Every unknowing but infected person appears to infect one other person during that period.[2] On the single day of December 9, 2020, Covid-19 killed more than 3,157 Americans[3], and almost 300,000 newly infected were identified.[4]

Posted By: Francis Koster Published: December 6, 2020

My father was a fireman and ambulance driver in a small town in Ohio. I have clear memories of going to the funeral of a fireman killed in the line of duty in a neighboring town. I was very young and had to hold my dad’s hand when we walked from the church to the cemetery. Flags at half-mast still have a powerful impact on me. Over Thanksgiving, I had a chat with a friend who is a lifelong member of the law enforcement community. We were discussing the existing and expanding stresses on First Responders as Covid-19 explodes around the coming holidays. I was explaining how awful the next few months are going to be, given the fact that it took 3 months for the first one million Americans to be infected, and 6 days for the latest one million, and the rate is rising.[1] I said I was worried about the stress on our doctors and nurses. He replied, “Do you know that more law enforcement officers die by suicide than are killed in the line of duty?” I did not. After we parted, I could not shake the emotions that statement caused in me. Got out my laptop and started researching. He was right.

Posted By: Francis Koster Published: November 22, 2020

There are four facts in this article you do not know. Our population of Covid-19 infected people is split into two groups.  The first group is those who have developed symptoms and are now visible and counted.  That number is growing about 162,000 per day in America.[1]  That highly visible group is spawned by a second invisible group – those who are infected but do not know it.   Scientists have shown that during last week, 3,600,000 Americans had the virus, did not know it, and each of those will infect about 3 others during the next 10-day window.[2],[3],[4],[5] We live in a country that is #1 in the world both in the number and the percentage of our population of `Covid-19 infections.[6]  Our hospitals are already overwhelmed, do not have enough doctors and nurses, and patients are in beds in parking garages, tents, and hallways.[7]

Posted By: Francis Koster Published: November 15, 2020

Our country is having two epidemics, not one. The first one is Covid-19. In the past eight months, the Covid-19 virus has infected almost 11 million Americans and killed four times more than were killed in the entire Vietnam war. [1],[2] The projections are that by the end of February 2021, the numbers of infected will double to more than 22 million, and the number of dead will equal that of those Americans killed in WWll.[3],[4] Family members of patients who have Covid-19 are also learning that it can cause long term damage to the heart, lungs, brain, and other parts of the bodies of those who survive.[5],[6],[7],[8],[9],[10] Depressing, isn’t it?  And that is just the first epidemic. The second epidemic is actually impacting far more people, but almost no one is talking about it. Chances are you have it or know someone who does. It is called Depression.

Posted By: Francis Koster Published: August 26, 2020

When most people think of K-12 schools, they think of things like reputation, quality of education, statewide rankings, school taxes, and so forth. What is often not recognized is the fact that public school systems are the major way many poor children get fed in our country. There are two public school systems in Cabarrus County. During the booming economy, last school year seven out of every ten of the students enrolled in the Kannapolis Public School System qualified for free or reduced-price breakfast and lunch on school days. If this program did not exist, 3,780 school kids would not have had enough food to eat during the school week. [1]

Posted By: Francis Koster Published: August 24, 2020

If I asked you where you would invest if you inherited some unexpected money this week, I bet your first thought would be into the stock market.  You may not know that there are other better local opportunities. The current COVID-19 epidemic has created two major wounds – on the bodies of those infected, and the health of the economy.  One out of five people that become infected have lifelong health damage, so staying at home is encouraged, [1][2][3][4][5] but we know that this has impacts: the economy will suffer, people will lose their jobs, homes, not have food, and may suffer mental stress.

Posted By: Francis Koster Published: July 19, 2020

GROWTH RATE OF COVID-19 IN NORTH CAROLINA The next year or so is going to test our individual souls, and the soul of our country. For all the public discussion and tension produced by the COVID epidemic, what we have seen thus far is only a hint of what is yet to come. Look at this history of infection in North Carolina and note how the rate of infection is increasing rapidly. This trend will continue because we will have no vaccination until Spring of 2021 at the earliest [2]. Until then, the only tools we have are face masks, hand washing, social distancing, and vitamin D3. The infections will continue to spread.

Posted By: Francis Koster Published: July 14, 2020

Scientists have discovered you can cut the risk of harm from COVID-19 to you and your loved ones almost in half by increasing your vitamin D3 levels. On March 1 in the entire United States there were 30 reported cases of the COVID-19 virus [1] and no deaths. That was only about 4 months ago. You can see this on-line at the Johns Hopkins COVID-19 dashboard https://coronavirus.jhu.edu/us-map [2]. According to that dashboard America now has over 3.3 million people infected, and the number infected has been doubling about every 23 days since early April! Take a moment and digest that.


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